March272014

So the plan so far is to do a honey jar spell for my daughter to help with friend making, and a sachet full of good sleep and good dream herbs for her nightmares.
But I’m open to more suggestions (especially for the nightmares).

March252014

My daughter informed me she wants an altar in her room. Like mine she says, with a spot for ancestors and Manannan, but instead of the Morrigan she wants Danu.
So I’m pretty excited to work on this with her. Also Saturday we are going to do a few friend making spells and anti nightmare spells for her.
I think Manannan would be helpful with the dreams. I see the dream world as a sort of sea, but that could be from reading The Great and Secret Show too many times.

Also I saw 8 crows on my drive to work. That is the most I’ve seen on a one way trip so far.

March22014

Gave offerings tonight for the first time in awhile. I just let so much other stuff get in the way.
I felt a certain goddess was due for sending so many crows my way.

February192014

Anonymous asked: Are you able to describe a little of how your religion revolves around the Gods of Terre D'Ange? Which of them speaks to you the strongest?

Unfortunately I haven’t been doing much work religion wise lately. And its a long boring storing. But I was working on a way to worship them as closely to the way the D’angelines in the book do. With small altars and offerings, not big enough to upset my the Morrigan.

Oddly enough, Azza still seems to have quite the pull on me despite my lack of work on the religion. I still occasionally post things to his e-shrine, think about him and get excited at lion related things. Perhaps Azza calls to me the strongest because I take pride in the work I do related to my job.

Or perhaps its because I should take pride in myself, though I don’t.

January72014
witch-warlock:

A bit of History about Witch bottles
The history of Witch-bottles goes back hundreds of years. The origins of this tradition have been dated to the 1500’s. They were used most actively for a couple of hundred years. This is the same time when the Witch-hunts were going on. After this period, the tradition slowly waned. The last historical Witch-bottle was found in a cabin built in mid 19th century, in Pershore, Worcestershire (UK).
The actual bottle of a traditional Witch-bottle during the 16th and 17th century was a German stone bottle called “bartmann” or “bellermine” bottle. Similar bottles of stone material were manufactured in Holland and Belgium. The technique wasn’t mastered in England before the 1660’s and bartmann bottle manufacturing was rare in Britain.
The bottle got its name from a cardinal called Bellarmino only after the Witch-bottle tradition had already begun. These bottles had a round belly and they were decorated with a facial image of a grim looking bearded man and a medallion of stylized floral or natural imagery. Glass bottles were also used.
Old Witch-bottles contained things like bent iron nails, human hair and urine. Other traditional items contained in Witch-bottles include small bones, thorns, and needles, pieces of wood and in some cases heart-shaped pieces of cloth.
The bottles were most often found buried under the fireplace. Other sites include under the floor, buried in the ground there, and plastered inside walls. The fireplace is, from a magical point of view, a security risk as it has a straight connection with the open skies above. It was believed that the curse of a Witch or even a Witch herself in a shape-shifted form could get into a house through the fireplace. Another security risk was the doorway, as doors are opened and closed several times throughout the day. In addition to the fireplace, the bottles were often hidden near the doorway.
On the Original Uses The most active period of Witch-bottle usage and the Witch-hunts don’t coincide by accident. The fear of Witches produced ways of protecting oneself against them during times when slightest misfortune was easily interpreted as being caused by a curse put on one or another member of the family. From the point of view of a present day Witch, the original purpose for building a Witch-bottle wasn’t that pleasant: they were intended to keep Witches and Witches’ curses away. The contents of a Witch-bottle were designed to not only divert an attacking Witch, but also to cause her to suffer the agonies brought on by all the nasty things inside the bottle. To put it simply: to turn the curse back to the curser.
The urine in the bottle symbolizes the target of the curse. The curser and the target of the curse were believed to have a strong connection and the curse was believed to target not only its intended victim, but also the bodily fluids of the target. When the bottle was placed in a way that made it easier for the curse to meet with the urine (in the Witch-bottle) before the actual target, the curse hit the bottle and not its intended victim. This is why the bottles were usually hidden where they were. The importance of hair was similar to that of the urine.
The Witch-bottle was believed to be active as long as the bottle remained hidden and unbroken. People did go through a lot of trouble in hiding their Witch-bottles. Those buried underneath fireplaces have been found only after the rest of the building has been torn down or otherwise disappeared.
Modern-Witch-Bottles Very generally speaking, the modern day Witch-bottles are very similar to historical Witch-bottles in their basic structure, even though their intended purpose has changed. The most common purpose for constructing a Witch-bottle today is capturing negative energies targeted at the constructor of the bottle, her family or her home. Even though some bottles are “mirroring” in nature, they aren’t normally built to cause agony to the sender of negative energy/caster of curses. Some Witch-bottles are intended to change negative energy into positive one and then release it into the surrounding area. This kind of bottles could be classified as “guard and protect”-bottles.
The basic structure of Witch-bottles can be used for purposes other than protective: for financial gain, for helping with artistic creativity, to call forth positive energy (instead of “just filtering out negative energy”), for improving health, etc.
Basically a Witch-bottle is a container of some sort, usually a jar or a bottle, which is filled with objects and often also liquids which fill a given magickal purpose. The person making the Witch-bottle, or in other words, the one casting the bottled spell, can charge the objects magickally beforehand and build the bottle to work on this charging until the need of renewing the spell arises. Witch-bottles can also be built to recharge themselves by the energy they ‘capture’ for as long as the bottle stays unbroken, whether it is years or centuries.
What Do Modern Witch-Bottles Contain? The typical contents of the basic protective Witch-bottle today is quite similar to that of the traditional one: nails, sand or different colored sands, crystals, stones, knotted threads, herbs, spices, resin, flowers, candle wax, incense, votive candles, salt, vinegar, oil, coins, saw dust, ashes etc etc. Actually, everything used in “normal spells” can be used in this bottled version of a spell, the Witch-bottle.
http://www.kitchenwitch.org/Original source: http://kitchenwitchuk.blogspot.ca

witch-warlock:

A bit of History about Witch bottles

The history of Witch-bottles goes back hundreds of years. The origins of this tradition have been dated to the 1500’s. They were used most actively for a couple of hundred years. This is the same time when the Witch-hunts were going on. After this period, the tradition slowly waned. The last historical Witch-bottle was found in a cabin built in mid 19th century, in Pershore, Worcestershire (UK).

The actual bottle of a traditional Witch-bottle during the 16th and 17th century was a German stone bottle called “bartmann” or “bellermine” bottle. Similar bottles of stone material were manufactured in Holland and Belgium. The technique wasn’t mastered in England before the 1660’s and bartmann bottle manufacturing was rare in Britain.

The bottle got its name from a cardinal called Bellarmino only after the Witch-bottle tradition had already begun. These bottles had a round belly and they were decorated with a facial image of a grim looking bearded man and a medallion of stylized floral or natural imagery. Glass bottles were also used.

Old Witch-bottles contained things like bent iron nails, human hair and urine. Other traditional items contained in Witch-bottles include small bones, thorns, and needles, pieces of wood and in some cases heart-shaped pieces of cloth.

The bottles were most often found buried under the fireplace. Other sites include under the floor, buried in the ground there, and plastered inside walls. The fireplace is, from a magical point of view, a security risk as it has a straight connection with the open skies above. It was believed that the curse of a Witch or even a Witch herself in a shape-shifted form could get into a house through the fireplace. Another security risk was the doorway, as doors are opened and closed several times throughout the day. In addition to the fireplace, the bottles were often hidden near the doorway.

On the Original Uses The most active period of Witch-bottle usage and the Witch-hunts don’t coincide by accident. The fear of Witches produced ways of protecting oneself against them during times when slightest misfortune was easily interpreted as being caused by a curse put on one or another member of the family. From the point of view of a present day Witch, the original purpose for building a Witch-bottle wasn’t that pleasant: they were intended to keep Witches and Witches’ curses away. The contents of a Witch-bottle were designed to not only divert an attacking Witch, but also to cause her to suffer the agonies brought on by all the nasty things inside the bottle. To put it simply: to turn the curse back to the curser.

The urine in the bottle symbolizes the target of the curse. The curser and the target of the curse were believed to have a strong connection and the curse was believed to target not only its intended victim, but also the bodily fluids of the target. When the bottle was placed in a way that made it easier for the curse to meet with the urine (in the Witch-bottle) before the actual target, the curse hit the bottle and not its intended victim. This is why the bottles were usually hidden where they were. The importance of hair was similar to that of the urine.

The Witch-bottle was believed to be active as long as the bottle remained hidden and unbroken. People did go through a lot of trouble in hiding their Witch-bottles. Those buried underneath fireplaces have been found only after the rest of the building has been torn down or otherwise disappeared.

Modern-Witch-Bottles Very generally speaking, the modern day Witch-bottles are very similar to historical Witch-bottles in their basic structure, even though their intended purpose has changed. The most common purpose for constructing a Witch-bottle today is capturing negative energies targeted at the constructor of the bottle, her family or her home. Even though some bottles are “mirroring” in nature, they aren’t normally built to cause agony to the sender of negative energy/caster of curses. Some Witch-bottles are intended to change negative energy into positive one and then release it into the surrounding area. This kind of bottles could be classified as “guard and protect”-bottles.

The basic structure of Witch-bottles can be used for purposes other than protective: for financial gain, for helping with artistic creativity, to call forth positive energy (instead of “just filtering out negative energy”), for improving health, etc.

Basically a Witch-bottle is a container of some sort, usually a jar or a bottle, which is filled with objects and often also liquids which fill a given magickal purpose. The person making the Witch-bottle, or in other words, the one casting the bottled spell, can charge the objects magickally beforehand and build the bottle to work on this charging until the need of renewing the spell arises. Witch-bottles can also be built to recharge themselves by the energy they ‘capture’ for as long as the bottle stays unbroken, whether it is years or centuries.

What Do Modern Witch-Bottles Contain? The typical contents of the basic protective Witch-bottle today is quite similar to that of the traditional one: nails, sand or different colored sands, crystals, stones, knotted threads, herbs, spices, resin, flowers, candle wax, incense, votive candles, salt, vinegar, oil, coins, saw dust, ashes etc etc. Actually, everything used in “normal spells” can be used in this bottled version of a spell, the Witch-bottle.

http://www.kitchenwitch.org/
Original source: http://kitchenwitchuk.blogspot.ca

(via caprileothevirgin)

October312013

Gentle reminder that I have moved blogs

I’m over at gardeniasandgasoline.

And this blog will be getting deleted at some point.

Its a side blog, and that makes it hard to answer asks and all that and keep it separate from my personal blog. So I made the new blog to make it easier.

October222013
dodgerthirteen:



Bibliomancy: A Guide
Bibliomancy: Interpreting Your Results
Bibliomancy: What Are Sacred Books?
If you, or anyone else, has questions about what is written here, just let me know.


Rebloggable by request.

dodgerthirteen:

Bibliomancy: A Guide

Bibliomancy: Interpreting Your Results

Bibliomancy: What Are Sacred Books?

If you, or anyone else, has questions about what is written here, just let me know.

Rebloggable by request.

(via soloontherocks)

August132013

New blog

Alright, so I decided that I was going to go ahead and make a separate blog for my pagan/witchy stuff as opposed to having this one as just a side blog. It will just be easier this way when it comes to following people and answering asks and such.

The new blog is gardeniasandgasoline. I will be moving a lot of posts from here to over there and eventually be deleting this blog, and all new content will be over there. So if you wish to continue following me, I ask that you follow the new blog.

Thanks :)

August122013
tarotgram:

It’s time for Sunday Spreads! Feel like you or a friend are in a toxic relationship? Try the You Deplete Me Spread! Remember, this can apply to all kinds of relationships, not just romantic ones.

tarotgram:

It’s time for Sunday Spreads! Feel like you or a friend are in a toxic relationship? Try the You Deplete Me Spread! Remember, this can apply to all kinds of relationships, not just romantic ones.

(via gardenofthequeen)

August102013

Witches Ladders

intrepidcrow-girl:

So, today we’re going to talk about a slightly more obscure tool: the witch’s ladder. There’s some debate as to whether or not this was a commonly used tool in older European traditions of witchcraft. In the late 1870’s a witch’s ladder, along with a collection of brooms, was found in the attic of a recently deceased woman in Somerset, sparking suspicions of witchcraft. Unfortunately, it’s not actually known whether or not this object was really used in witchcraft or how widespread the use may have been if it was. More on the history of these tools can be found here.

Now, what is a witch’s ladder? It’s a type of knot talisman made by inserting small objects into a length of cord, traditionally rooster feathers and sometimes small bones were used but you can use locks of hair, teeth, beads, sticks, leaves, seashells or pretty much anything that works for your practice.

image

Originally, it’s thought that they were used to curse but their uses in modern practices are endless. I’ll be making one to protect my house and create easier communication with the Other Realms.

How to Make a Witches Ladder

Ok, to start us off we need a few supplies. There are three main things that I’m using.

image

First is the cord, feel free to use whatever material you like. When I’m doing work like this I prefer to use regular old kitchen twine. It’s sturdy and not overly processed. You could use yarn, thread, rope, sinew or ribbon as well though.

The second thing that I’ll be using is a couple of small bones, I’m using six because I like working with multiples of three.

Finally, the feathers. These are brown mourning dove feathers; I’m using these as opposed to another type of feather because they’re good for communicating with Spirit and for fostering awareness. 

I would like to mention here that while handy in the craft, collecting bones and feathers that you find can be illegal. Most birds are protected species and regardless of whether you found the feathers or ripped them off of the bird yourself, possessing them is illegal. Be sure to check the laws in your area. This problem can usually be solved by writing a letter to the appropriate wildlife officials asking for permission to pick up specific types of bird feathers for a collection. Once written permission is obtained it only has to be kept with the feathers to avoid any ramifications. Of course, if you’re not going to be waving about rare bird feathers in the town square this is probably unnecessary. 

As I said, you can replace bones or feathers with whatever you like. Use Barbie arms if that’s what floats your boat. I usually use nine items in mine and the traditional number would be thirteen but feel free to adjust this to fit your needs.

Another optional material would be a metal ring, you can tie the ladder to this and use that to hang it from a hook on the ceiling or something if you like. I’ll just be using a thumbtack.

As always prep yourself and your workspace however you prefer. Cast a circle, take a ritual bath, light some incense, maybe put on some music. Consecrate your supplies and get to work.

The creation of a witch’s ladder is surprisingly simple and quick. Take your cord and cut three equal lengths. How long you make it is up to you, for example, I like each length to be from the fingertips of my left hand to my heart in length. Tie the ends together, if you are using a metal ring, tie it to the ring; otherwise just an overhand knot on the end does the trick.

Start braiding, for this one I used your typical three-strand braid but you could add and subtract cords and use rope braids, fishtail braids or five strand braids as well. As you braid begin adding in your objects. I don’t do anything special, I just keep braiding as usual while adding my feathers and stuff in between two strands. Here’s a close-up of my ladder partially finished.

image

I spread mine out semi-evenly along the length of the cord, if you’re a stickler about getting things even then make sure you remember that you’ll lose about a third of the cord length in the process of braiding. 

As you add each item to the ladder spend a few moments to state your intention or meditate on the purpose of your spell. I kind of just spend the entire time I’m making the ladder talking to it and telling it what I would like of it. You could also use the traditional nine knot spell if incantations are your thing. I find them too constricting for my practice but for those of you who prefer more ritualized working here it is 

"By knot of one, the spell is begun

By knot of two, it cometh true

By knot of three, so mote it be

By knot of four, the open door

By knot of five, it comes alive

By knot of six, the spell is fixed

By knot of seven, it has the power of heaven

By knot of eight, the open gate

By knot of nine, it is mine”


After all of your items are in place you need to finish your cord. You can just tie a knot in it and either trim the excess cord or let it hang there, or you can add something to the end as a sort of weight, bells are a common choice. Feel free to let it charge in the light of the moon or sun if you like.

Once it’s completely done take it and hang it somewhere, I like to have them on my porch but hanging it in your room or kitchen works as well. If the spell is more malicious I’d suggest hiding it away somewhere close to your target instead of hanging it.

Here’s my finished ladder, hanging out on my porch.

image

image

A few ideas for uses of these lovely tools:

  • Warding magic - Use to create a “Do Not Enter” sign for unfriendly energies. The ladder conveys the meaning that those who would harm are unwelcome.
  • Attraction magic - Use it to attract people, familiars, ideas, mindsets, jobs, circumstances, luck, etc. into your life
  • Binding the thirteen moons of the year - This is a method used to harness the power of the thirteen full moons of the year, allowing you to perform weather magic and nature magic more easily and opening the doorway to the Other Realms.
  • Traveling - Ladders can be used as a gate into the Other Realms. An actual “ladder” for your spirit to climb up into various planes
  • Natural magic - You can use items related to the branch of nature that you work with. For me it’s trees but perhaps you work with the ocean, mountains, forests, animals, insects, and so on.
  • Wish magic - You can use rolled up slips of paper or pressed leaves and make a ladder with them, writing your wish on each one. As the ladder is slowly destroyed by the elements, your wish comes true.
  • Divination - I’ll need to make a full post about this if anyone is interested, it’s a tad complicated
  • Worship - You could use a witches ladder as an offering to a deity, perhaps as a nine day devotional where you tie in an offering every day and ending with hanging it on the last day
  • Curses - and of course, witches ladders can be used to curse. 

As usual, if anyone has any questions or would like me to make a follow up post on anything I’ve mentioned here, let me know!

(Source: intrepidcrow, via deitycrafts)

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